Offering attorneys and their clients the latest i research and up to the minute SEC filing information. You need substance to make a claim and the exemplar your take to court can make the difference for prevailing in a wrongful foreclosure case. Ph 213-805-0157 www.borrowerhotline.com * Foreclosure Process Overview * How to Buy Foreclosures * Foreclosure Laws * Foreclosure Articles * Foreclosure Trends * Foreclosure Software * Avoid or Stop Foreclosure * Bank Owned Foreclosures / REO Homes * Veteran Affairs / Government Foreclosures * HUD Foreclosures * Foreclosure Questions and Answers * Foreclosure Auctions * Foreclosure Financing


What is the History of Notices?

The History of Notices section includes a list of all the data records RealtyTrac has for that property. Since RealtyTrac receives foreclosure information from different data sources, it’s not uncommon for several records (with separate property Id’s) to appear in our database for the same property. Some of the other data records may have more details about the property, including contact information (owner, trustee, lender) and estimated price information (Balance, Opening Bid, Trans Value).

 

Why is the data sometimes different between records in the History of Notices?

The data for different records on the History of Notices for a property may vary for several reasons.

First, the records in the History of Notices may represent different notices filed during the foreclosure process. The notices tracked by RealtyTrac include pre-foreclosure notices (NOD, LIS); notice of trustee or foreclosure sale (NTS, NFS); and bank repossessions (REOs). So you may see an NOD, an NTS and an REO on the same property to represent the different stages of the foreclosure process. The balance and default amount will change slightly throughout the foreclosure process, so you may see different amounts for those.

Second, the records in the History of Notices may represent more than one lien holder or lender foreclosing on the same property at the same time. While relatively rare, multiple foreclosure proceedings will result in multiple notices with different amounts and different trustees and lenders. For example, if two lien holders file a Notice of Default on a property at the same time, the property history page would contain two records, both with the status of NOD, but each with a different balance, default amount, lender and trustee. To determine if the records signify separate foreclosure proceedings, compare the lender name, trustee name, and loan date (if available). If any of these are different, or if the balance or default amounts are extremely different, that indicates multiple foreclosure proceedings on the same property.

Third, the records in the History of Notices may represent data RealtyTrac has received from different sources. So you might see two NOD records that have the same lender, same trustee and same default amount. This indicates both records represent the same foreclosure proceeding, but RealtyTrac includes data from both sources to provide as much information as possible about the property. Some of our sources overlap, but provide different levels of information. We suggest you review and compare both records to get the complete picture.

 

 

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